Monday, July 30, 2012

Historical Preservation Societies

 I've been researching different historical preservation societies around the country because one will play prominently in a new project. What I discovered was fascinating reading with stories of their own to be shared and passed down to generations to come. It's been a wonderful researching experience.
Most organizations came about because a few people in a town became concerned when old buildings were knocked down to clean up cities and make way for the new and modern world. Some organizations were formed at the turn of the 20th century, others earlier, and some even later. In one Texas town a group was formed in the late l960's when the old railway depot was torn down. A few citizens had tried to stop it and failed. Crushed and angry that some citizens couldn't see the value in preserving history, they formed their group and today it is responsible for saving more historical buildings. In return those buildings became a boon to the city as mini-museums attracting tourists, field trips for the school children, and being places to hold special events.
I'm sorry to say I took these organizations and the selfless people who are members for granted. I won't ever be guilty of that again. If you have a few minutes,find out if your town has a group and read all about it, you won't be disappointed.




10 comments:

  1. Great post. I grew up in a town that knocked everything down that didn't move. Awful. But they have a terrific historical society that's been able to salvage some of its past. Fortunately, the town I live in now is the opposite—they have a great respect for their past and their history, and great pride in it, too. Lovely.

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  2. That's great, Andrea. In the town I spent my teen years through my fifites, the town tore down the huge white columns and tossed them in the river. They removed everything from the outside and covered the whole thing in marble. It's a beautiful building for a modern building, but all we have left are the pictures of the old courthouse. It even was on a small rise overlooking a natural lake. They drained the lake, filled it in with dirt, and built more buildings and parking lots. The newspaper printed pictures of the "old days" where citizens were ice skating on the lake. I'm so happy that the mindset is changing.

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  3. I am currently developing an "Our Town then and Now" presentation to give to the senior center where I work in October. I'm been plowing through our Historical Society's files and am having an absolute blast learning about town history. We are lucky in that many, many homes and buildings in town are antiques, and the mindset here is to maintain these delights from the past.

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    1. Oh, Liza, how wonderful! The people in the center are going to love the presentation and bring back lots of good memories.

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  4. What a fun and fascinating topic to research!

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    1. It was, Kimberly, I thoroughly enjoyed it.

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  5. Fun topic! Our town has a group that held a Chataqua event this weekend. There was an old-time baseball game, band, ice cream social, and viewing of old photos when our town had a working depot along the railroad~ neat stuff!

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    1. That sounds like fun as well as a good way to develop a love for history in the kids.

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  6. We do have a historical society in Sacramento, and I have to say, thanks to them, quite a few old Victorians and bungalows have been preserved, as well as some of the old commercial buildings (although in some cases of the latter, only their outer shells, with revamped interiors). I'm so glad, too. I think the older architecture has so much character. I love walking around Midtown for that reason.

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  7. I agree about the older architecture. I bet Midtown is a wonderful place to tour.

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